Demographics


The number of Facebook users in the US will inch up 0.9% this year to 169.5 million. While growth has plateaued, Facebook is still the most used social network among all age groups, except for teens.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer's Mark Dolliver discusses how teens indulge in too much screen time, and the extent to which they and their parents see this excessive usage as a problem.

Every week on eMarketer’s “Behind the Numbers” podcast, we take a few minutes to discuss some of the most intriguing headlines of the past seven days. This week, some of the topics we’re talking about include how teens are turning to Instagram to make some extra money, plus how ecommerce and low prices may be turning some consumers into hoarders.

Social media usage—both for personal and business use—is so widespread that occasional social implosions are relatively commonplace. How widespread? eMarketer estimates that roughly nine out of 10 companies use social networks as a marketing tool, and that level of involvement has been steady for years.

About one in five affluent consumers in the US make no use of any technology while in stores. That’s right: no price checks on a smartphone while shopping, no taking pictures of products and certainly no mobile payments.

It seems like teenagers would appreciate taking a break from their smartphones, if only they knew how.

Data from the Pew Research Center indicates some similarities in attitudes across age groups when it comes to technology companies.

Snap Inc.'s share price stumbled Wednesday after the company disclosed user growth that failed to meet Wall Street expectations. But that reaction obscures gains for Snapchat's programmatic advertising platforms.

With more than half of US households with children feeling financially strained, many parents look for what’s on sale or use coupons to save money.

Armed with a lengthy list of needed school supplies, US mothers are upping their omnichannel approach for the back-to-school season, according to a new survey.

Snapchat will overtake Facebook among 18- to 24-year-olds this year, according to eMarketer’s latest forecast on social network usage.

For many back-to-school shoppers, finding quality items is important, as is spending as little time as possible in the store. But nothing beats a good deal.

Older teens and young adults aren't as reliant on mobile as you might think. They use smartphones to browse, compare and research, but they aren’t avid users of transactional mcommerce.

Nowhere is the shift from offline to online booking more pronounced than in China. Digital travel sales in the region will total $133.90 billion in 2018, a 20.5% increase over 2017.

We let the eMarketer interns take over the studio for a day so they could explain their digital behaviors to the world. Are these younger folks using Facebook the way they used to? What do they use each of the social media platforms for? What do they think about digital advertising? How do their spending habits vary?

Millennials have been the focus of advertisers, retailers and media for over a decade. Marketers are recognizing this massive shift, but not all are capable of meeting the expectations of younger consumers.

Although their children are digital natives, many US parents worry their kids are too enthralled by device screens. But the remedies have downsides, too.

Older consumers often get short shrift in studies about online shopping behavior because they aren't digital natives like coveted Gen Z and millennials. But it makes sense that older consumers who may not drive or who may have trouble carrying groceries would take advantage of online grocery delivery if they could.

In an IBM and CMO Council survey of senior marketing, supply chain and ecommerce execs worldwide, 48% of respondents said their investments in data are paying partial returns, but they doubt their vendors will deliver on all of their pledges.

The emergence of millennials with significant disposable income is a key demographic trend across Western Europe, and it is already having a dramatic effect.