Demographics

People with disabilities make up a large, but diverse and underserved, segment of the US population. According to recent statistics from the CDC, 67 million adults in the US—or 26% of the population—report living with at least one type of disability.

Today’s sociopolitical events have lit a fire under brands to address social injustice and diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in deeper ways than they have in the past. Companies are using marketing and advertising to respond to and support discussions about systemic racism and the Black Lives Matter protests, the fight for LGBTQ rights, the #MeToo movement, the COVID-19 pandemic, and issues of immigration reform, to name a few.

For knowledge workers, the coronavirus pandemic brought an abrupt change to daily work life. As many companies shut down their corporate offices—some out of regard for employee safety and others due to government mandates—the norm of conducting business from an office ceased. Without an in-person option, teams were forced into a distributed work model and given little to no time to prepare.

The pandemic has been able to make common what would previously have stood out as extreme amounts of screen time.

The screen-time wars are over in many households, with parents having surrendered en masse. In a period when large numbers of parents and school kids are stuck at home with one another, this is one battle many parents choose to forego, at least for now.

eMarketer principal analysts Mark Dolliver and Nicole Perrin, junior forecasting analyst Nazmul Islam and senior forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence Oscar Orozco discuss what the coronavirus pandemic has and hasn't done to print media. They then talk about racial diversity in ads, millennials in decision-making roles, and American teens' favorite social media platforms.

As companies like Twitter and Microsoft announce long-term remote work policies, business leaders are grappling with what their return-to-office plan may look like.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio at Insider Intelligence Paul Verna discuss how negative emotions are received in ads, whether we're witnessing the beginning of the end of the Upfronts, if paying with your hands is a good idea, the significance of LinkedIn Stories, if parents are actually influencers, what the Boston Celtics and Twitter have in common, and more.

The pandemic has caused reduced advertiser spending overall, leading to lower growth of in-app ad spending despite significantly higher numbers of ad placements. While in-app purchases (IAPs) never stopped growing amid the pandemic, publisher revenues have recently been shifting from in-app advertising to purchases.

Many US adults said they plan to keep their music subscriptions (72%), exercise/fitness/wellness subscriptions (64%), and digital learning subscriptions (54%) post-pandemic.

With wide disparities in consumers’ balance sheets, there’s less variation than one might expect in the incidence of financial anxiety, which has percolated up the income scale.

eMarketer principal analysts Debra Aho Williamson and Mark Dolliver, and forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence Eric Haggstrom discuss Facebook's recent decision on political ads and how brands can reach social users over the coming months. They then talk about Facebook's plans to limit ads on pages, how this year's events have changed Gen Z's relationship with brands, and why Americans still pay for live TV.

eMarketer principal analyst Mark Dolliver, junior analyst Blake Droesch and vice president of content studio at Insider Intelligence Paul Verna discuss how to recreate those water cooler moments in the digital world, how much Super Bowl LV commercials are going for, watching Instagram Stories on Facebook, parents' more positive view of devices, the number of Facebook Watch viewers, the difference between frugal and cheap, what you didn't notice about that double rainbow, and more.

TikTok’s future may be uncertain in the US, but its UK operations continue to grow robustly despite security concerns. According to our latest UK social network forecast, the Chinese-owned video platform will have several milestone moments this year and next.

eMarketer principal analysts Mark Dolliver and Yory Wurmser and forecasting analyst at Insider Intelligence Eric Haggstrom discuss whether Uber, Lyft and Airbnb can make a comeback. They then talk about what kids are doing with their increased screen time, location data consent and how comfortable Americans are with normal, everyday activities.

As layoffs pile up and many industries like retail and travel continue to struggle amid lower consumer spending, confidence in a near-term economic recovery is low.

More than eight in 10 baby boomers worldwide said they are still willing to shop for food and beverages in-store despite the pandemic, according to July 2020 data from Braze.

Boomers aren't entirely nondigital⁠—they were, after all, the pioneers of adopting home computers—but at this point in their lives, they're a bit more reluctant about adopting newer technologies. That's true even for tech with real-life utility, such as voice assistants and smart-home devices, which could help boomers age in place and deal with the physical challenges that accompany increasing age. Along with concerns about things like privacy, it’s partly a matter of the inertia about adopting new things that tends to set in as one gets older.

Back-to-school shopping may look a little different this year because of the pandemic—but only slightly.

Many consumers’ shopping behaviors have moved online in recent months, and that trend is likely to continue through the holiday shopping season.