Demographics


Gen Z is a tough generation for retailers to figure out. They grew up on the internet, but don't like to be targeted with ads there, and crave authenticity in all of their interactions. We parsed the research to help retailers figure it out.

Pressed for time and money more than in their childless days, today’s parents are increasingly using digital tools to supplement their in-store shopping.

Millennials’ propensity for digital usage carries over to their shopping. And it exposes them to plenty of digital advertising, about which they have mixed feelings—especially since online reviews are an appealing alternative source of information.

Valentine's Day is evolving and growing to be more inclusive—with that, consumers are celebrating and shopping differently.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," we're checking in with the youngest generation, and looking at their relationship with money. Analyst Mark Dolliver digs into the data about how kids earn money, how much they save and what they are spending it on.

Kids continue to be an anomaly of the digital era. While few have smartphones or inhabit the social networks that preoccupy teens and adults, their sheer amount of screen time nonetheless manages to feel like a national crisis.

eMarketer's "Do You Have a Second?" is a mini-podcast that offers a quick hit of the latest digital data. Today, we’re talking about cookies—who's baking and who's buying—millennials’ attitudes about kindness (and what that might mean for shopping), and wearable device growth.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer's demographics specialists, Mark Dolliver and Jennifer Pearson, consider the latest data about children's screen time. How much time are kids spending in front of screens, and what does it mean for their health and well-being?

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," the first in a two-part series, eMarketer demographics specialists Mark Dolliver and Jennifer Pearson discuss kids and screens—and how parents approach the mix.

Due to the growing number of channels available and younger consumers reaching adulthood, expectations for customer service have been changing.

This year, we forecast that 55.4 million millennials ages 23 to 38 will use digital banking. But, they’re not all fans of digital-only banking.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer's demographics mavens, Mark Dolliver and Jenni Pearson, join us in the studio to discuss their latest research on millennials. What does adulthood look like for this generation?

Millennial preferences and spending habits have disrupted virtually every aspect of the retail sector. Here's a roadmap for attracting and retaining millennial customers, in five charts.

Corporate social responsibility appeals to millennials—a generation of researchers who value authenticity, transparency and reliability.

Millennials have been credited with upending entire industries, and retail is no exception. Here's what retailers need to know about attracting and retaining consumers from a maturing generation of digital shoppers.

Gen Xers’ wearable usage is rising, albeit slower than it has in past years. By the end of 2018, 15.4 million Gen Xers will have used a wearable device at least once per month, up from 14.0 million in 2017.

This year, 23.8 million US millennials will have used a wearable device at least once per month. That's roughly a third of the millennial population, according to our estimates.

Adoption of wearables among teens is low. Just one in 10 internet users ages 12 to 17 will use a wearable device in 2018.

If you’re still looking for a holiday gift for a parent or grandparent, a wearable device could be well-received. Americans 55 and older are the fastest-growing group of electronic wearable users in the US, according to eMarketer’s latest wearables forecast, largely due to the devices’ enhanced health features.

The number of boomers watching digital video on a monthly basis might not be as high as younger generations, but the 37.7 million who will do so this year are more likely to use computers and streaming services than their smartphones.