Media & Entertainment


In the latest episode of eMarketer's "Behind the Numbers," analysts Gerard Broussard and Paul Verna discuss the reasons ad spending on advanced TV is growing—and why it still hasn't fully taken off yet.

The number of boomers watching digital video on a monthly basis might not be as high as younger generations, but the 37.7 million who will do so this year are more likely to use computers and streaming services than their smartphones.

This year, 64.8 million millennials will watch digital video at least once a month, according to eMarketer estimates. That figure will continue to increase year over year, reaching 66.8 million by 2022.

A lot of companies in the ad industry hope to profit from the digitalization of TV. But as with any big change, uncertainty creates some fear.

This year, we expect 46.0 million US households will use a smart TV at least once per month, a 16.0% increase from 2017.

In the latest episode of “Behind the Numbers,” eMarketer’s Ross Benes talks with Jon Romano, vice president of agency development at SpotX, about how ad buyers accidentally overlook connected TV inventory.

In the second part of our three-part podcast series on the shifting TV and digital video ecosystem, we're focusing on the audience. Analyst Paul Verna talks about mobile viewers, cord cutters, connected TV watchers and more.

The digitalization of TV has changed how viewers can access content. dataxu shares an infographic to help marketers learn more about the changing TV landscape.

As linear television ratings decline because Americans are consuming content on one of several OTT platforms, it’s tempting to argue for an immediate shift in the advertising model. While TV is changing, that change isn’t as rapid as industry pundits think. dataxu shares why marketers will be best served by media strategies that pair linear TV with connected TV.

Although connected TV advertising makes up a small portion of overall video ad spending, and has its share of challenging dynamics, it’s expected to grow in the coming years as audiences continue to embrace digital streaming on their living room screens. Paul Verna, eMarketer’s principal analyst, video, examines the connected TV space through the lens of advertising opportunities and challenges.

Just like their younger cohorts, Gen Xers are shifting their viewing habits from traditional TV to digital video.

The podcast ad market is taking off as people increasingly tune in. But large brand advertisers still want better measurement and analytics before they really buy in.

While kids are not likely to own a smartphone or have a large social media presence, video dominates their digital activity.

Spotify will see double-digit growth in 2018, according to eMarketer estimates. We expect 58.4 million people in the US to use Spotify, which represents 20.8% of internet users. This and other digital trends are included in this year's Global Media Intelligence report. Today, we take a look at the streaming audio market.

This year, we expect 170.1 million people in the US will use a subscription OTT service, like Netflix—making up 60.8% of internet users.

In the final episode of our three-part series on the TV and digital video ecosystem, analyst Paul Verna focuses on the question of content. How much content is being created and who are the leading creators? Can the torrid pace of creation continue, or will it ease up?

In the first of a three-part series on digital video and TV, analyst Paul Verna breaks down the data on ad spending and subscription fees. When will digital video ad spend catch up with TV ad spend? How much subscription income is flowing into services like Netflix and Hulu?

Creative professionals would rather work on projects centered around emerging technologies than spending more time coding, according to a recent study.

Ad tech vendors and digitally savvy publishers would like to cash in on the digitization of TV advertising. But that may take a while.

If you watch Connected TV—whether through an internet-enabled device like a Roku, on your mobile phone or a smart TV set—you’re not alone. About half of all US consumers accessed traditional TV content over the internet last year, according to eMarketer. But despite that massive audience, agencies and advertisers have been slow to adapt to Connected TV.