Media & Entertainment

On today's episode, we discuss the current diagnosis of Netflix—are their best days behind them, what will they need to do to keep the competition at bay, and what should we make of the rumored acquisition of Roku. "In Other News," we talk about YouTube making it easier to interact with the app on connected TVs (CTVs) and the prospect of its new frequency-capping solution. Tune in to the discussion with our analyst Ross Benes.

Though video gaming has been around for decades, it was the entertainment of choice for many during the pandemic.

Marketers across five leading verticals all allocated more than 50% of video impression share to connected TV (CTV), according to a 2021 Innovid report, illustrating CTV’s position as a mainstream way of consuming content.

Meta on the ropes: Meta shares have dropped, but metaverse adoption is expected to be a $13 trillion industry by 2030 as more players build competing immersive VR experiences.

New games, same ideology: Beijing regulators approved dozens of video games this week. But it may end up benefiting the broader tech sector and economy more than the gaming industry.

Netflix and Roku are the right match at the wrong time: A rumored merger makes sense on the surface, but not in the current landscape.

Meta thinks users need stepping stones to the metaverse: Its Crayta announcement suggests many consumers need to be pushed along the “immersion continuum.”

All eyes on Apple: As expectations mount for AR/VR product plans, Apple doubles down on iPhone, Mac, and iPad—a move that might indicate its metaverse ambitions are on hold.

This year, 57% of US video ad spending will go to linear TV, a decline from 62% in 2021 and 71% in 2020. By comparison, ad spend share is increasing for connected TV (CTV) and other digital formats such as social video.

Tech wrestles with an era of uncertainty: As 2022 hits the halfway point, we look at how various technology companies navigate expected and unexpected challenges that could alter the business landscape.

Sheryl Sandberg is leaving Meta at a crossroads: Departure of No. 2 exec comes as company faces major business challenges.

Sony’s future gaming fortunes are in PC titles: The PlayStation maker is betting big on ports of its games on Windows PCs, a market where console rival Microsoft is already a dominant player.

The metaverse market could shortly get a lot bigger: Apple’s RealityOS, rumored for an announcement next Monday, will encourage many on-the-fence consumers to adopt VR.

Upfront spending is flowing toward streaming services. Upfront CTV ad spending will grow by 34.6% to $6.41 billion this year. For context, that’s about how much we had predicted in our inaugural forecast would be spent on total CTV advertising in 2019.

Warner Bros. Discovery could use its size to boost ad costs: Media powerhouse seeking higher prices for its content in initial upfront talks.

Substack wasn’t the answer to digital publishing’s problems: The company has opted out of a Series C amid economic uncertainty.

Spotify is the No. 1 digital audio service among US teens and adults, with 35% digital audio listeners ages 12 and older using that platform the most. YouTube Music comes in at No. 2, with 18%, while Pandora rounds out the top three at 15%.

Broadcom boosts software with VMware buy: The $61B deal allows the chipmaker to rely less on chips for growth while assembling parts for massive cloud, edge computing, and IoT expansion.

Sony’s service game push could be good for advertisers: The lucrative model could be a platform for its rumored ad program

While traditional TV ad spending will struggle for growth in the coming years, digital video will not. A portion of digital video spend will go to the nascent CTV space, but traditional broadcasters are also developing their own streaming services (with BVOD ad spend rising at a far faster rate than traditional TV spend). Overall, the advertising opportunity for CTV remains small.