Video

On today's episode, we discuss whether ride-sharing and delivery services can survive, the "choosing to live with less" movement, buying with purpose, whether Disney+ subscribers will overtake Netflix, Facebook's (Meta's) new glove, the "great big Thanksgiving quiz," what doesn't exist in California, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior forecasting analyst Peter Vahle, analyst Blake Droesch, and principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Paul Verna.

About two-thirds of the US population are monthly connected TV (CTV) users. Young people are more likely to use CTV than older people. Four in 10 US senior citizens are CTV users—whereas CTV usage is about double that, more than 80%, among those ages 25 to 54.

As the average time spent with digital video continues to increase, wouldn’t it be amazing to be able to present your brand’s video content with an experience just like on your audience’s favorite streaming platform?

On today's episode, we discuss why Disney+ subscriber growth has slammed into a wall and how HBO Max might make its offering even more competitive. We then talk about whether Roku's recent slowdown is temporary or something more systemic, and if Peacock will likely move up—or down—Americans' video streaming priorities list. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior analyst at Insider Intelligence Ross Benes.

Riot Games’ launch of its animated series “Arcane” shows the importance of meeting fans where they are: The developer’s Netflix-exclusive show will be promoted across all of its video games and will premiere live on Twitch.

Netflix is forecast to spend more on original programming than ever before, splitting its global content budget almost evenly between that and licensing costs.

Faze Clan's public offering will be a proving ground for public creator economy companies: The organization started in 2010—before influencers and creators were the norm—and its market performance could foreshadow similar moves from newer companies.

Baby boomers are the only generation in the US that watches cable TV in significant numbers.

Spotify’s video podcasting push could bring in more users and marketers: Podcasts are already gaining steam with both groups, and video will help make the medium—and ads in it—even more engaging.

YouTube is carving into social commerce and TV measurement: The platform is leveraging both its deep pool of creators and large TV-based audience to get a leg up on competitors.

YouTube videos are the most popular media among US children online, with 85% of those surveyed watching that content recently.

A standard currency for TV and digital is unlikely, despite buyers’ wishes: Media buyers want more connection between linear and streaming TV, and though individual networks are making strides, an industrywide solution is unlikely.

Though HBO Max did not come close to reaching 100 million US viewers over the period of our previous forecast, we now project the streaming platform will cross that threshold in 2023.

In September, we raised our forecast for HBO Max viewers. We now believe that HBO Max will have nearly 80 million monthly viewers this year, and that it will surpass 100 million viewers by the end of 2023. Previously, we did not expect HBO Max to break 100 million viewers by the end of our forecast period in 2025.

In the US, Hulu is the fastest-growing subscription streamer on connected TV devices, with the number of households that watch it via those devices rising by 53% between January 2020 and June 2021.

Following an announcement from YouTube Premium that they've hit 50 million subscribers worldwide, we have updated our US forecast to reflect the platforms uptick. We now forecast YouTube Premium will hit 29.5 million US subscribers by year-end 2021.

Twitch’s market dominance is under the microscope after a data breach exposes security flaws, payouts: More leaks could be on the way and could lead Amazon to face scrutiny from regulators and its own users.

On today's episode, we discuss which ad-supported video-on-demand (AVOD) services Americans are using, why they're using them, and if these types of viewers are different from those using subscription video-on-demand (SVOD). We then talk about what livestream TV could do to help users sign up at a faster clip, how SVOD players can reduce churn, and what to make of Disney+ considering an ad-supported tier. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Paul Verna.

YouTube viewers are pivoting to TV screens as their method of choice for watching content, a trend that experienced significant growth before and during the height of the pandemic. We estimate that 113.1 million US YouTube viewers, 52.8% of total viewers, watched the platform's content on connected TV (CTV) devices in 2020. Those numbers will increase to 130.8 million and 57.7% by 2022.