Mobile


Most parents in Japan say they let their kids use a smartphone at least sometimes. According to 2015 research, children use the devices most to consume visual media—and the time they spend doing so doesn’t add up to much.

Nearly three-quarters of retailers worldwide said they wanted their apps to offer payment security. Preventing fraud is more important for retailers than seamless ordering capabilities.

Mobile accounted for more than half of digital ad spending in 2015, and marketers continue to see increased value in mobile advertising. While there are benefits, there are challenges too, according to Q3 2015 research.

Snapchat’s audience in the US is growing and the platform can be an effective way for marketers to reach consumers, especially millennials. According to research, more US senior ad buyers are planning to begin advertising on Snapchat than other social media sites.

Many consumers are not downloading and using mobile apps because of increasing privacy and security concerns, according to 2015 research. Some have even deleted an app or stopped using it because of this issue.

Health and fitness have provided a key opening for wearables-makers, as internet users tend to be attracted to such devices to keep tabs on their activity levels. In the UK, mobile users are open to many applications that could prove relevant to wearables.

Nearly half of US mobile users are interested in mobile-based account control for debit cards, like tools to help them control their spending and avoid fraud.

Mobile messaging takes up a lot of smartphone time in China, where the average user has significantly increased time spent with their device in the past year. Online video viewing takes a distant second for smartphone time.

Mobile device users are split in their preference for mobile apps vs. the mobile browser, per December 2015 research. Nearly one-third say they prefer to use both at different times.

Mobile connections have plateaued in Chile, but users are still making moves to switch to faster-paced mobile broadband connections. 4G connections more than doubled between 2014 and June 2015.

Most smartphone users in Japan turn to apps for information about what’s going on in the world—at least for a few minutes a day, according to December research. Penetration is highest among men and older users.

Magnus Jern, president of the Mobile Application Solutions Division at DMI, a creator of mobile apps for global brands, discusses how consumers are using mobile apps to influence purchasing decisions, conducting research and shipping in-store purchases to their doorstep.

When online, mobile internet users in the UK are highly likely to be in an app environment. Even when they’re not online, apps account for a huge proportion of time spent with mobile media. As smartphone and tablet use becomes increasingly prevalent, app usage is seeing a massive jump, too.

Retailers increasingly offer customers mobile apps with in-store functions, and according to a September 2015 report by Poq, 71% of in-store mobile app sessions by UK users focused on the store finder.

Internet users in Japan have migrated a variety of activities to mobile devices as they have adopted smartphones and tablets, according to December 2015 research. One reason is the convenience of mobile access in any location.

Mobile is coming to account for an ever-increasing proportion of programmatic digital ad spending in the UK. As with the wider programmatic landscape, an education phase is currently under way, but marketers are learning fast.

Passengers on France's public transport networks increasingly pass the time with mobile devices rather than print newspapers and books, according to October 2015 research.

Brazil has Latin America’s largest mobile internet market, and according to November research, users of all ages have widely adopted smartphones.

Mobile video advertising brings a lot of value to marketers, primarily increasing brand awareness. It also helps with lead generation and better engagement, according to a December 2015 survey.

Social network Line is big in Japan, especially among women. Its only social media rival in the country is YouTube, which has a completely different use case. And research suggests most Line users are highly engaged.