Advertising & Marketing

On today's episode, we discuss the who, what, where, when, why, and how of this year's back-to-school shopping season. We then talk about why facial recognition is surging in stores, what happens if prices continue to climb, and standout retailer TV campaigns. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Suzy Davidkhanian.

US children are getting their dose of advertising from YouTube. In April 2021, 70% of those ages 2 to 12 said they had recently seen ads on YouTube, far more than the 36% who reported the same of TV.

Could Amazon be in trouble? With many key executives departing, new CEO Andy Jassy could face major hurdles in attracting top talent and maintaining the company’s overall growth.

On today's episode, we discuss what users are viewing on Facebook, how to measure attention, whether Toys R Us can make a comeback, the scope of the ad frequency problem, how important AI is to advertising, how soon will work meetings move into virtual reality, how Nicole discovered a ground-breaking literary link that made national news, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer director of reports editing Rahul Chadha and principal analysts at Insider Intelligence Nicole Perrin and Paul Verna.

Advertisers may never see the likes of Nielsen again: NBCUniversal announced it is creating an independent measurement system in partnership with other firms.

More than 90 groups signed a letter demanding Apple cease rollout of its CSAM scanning tool, citing the potential for misuse. The continued pressure could stand as a major inflection point in Apple’s brand history.

China catches up in data privacy: Its new laws give consumers similar levels of data protection in the private sector as the EU's GDPR, which could help streamline data usage guidelines worldwide.

Regulators are finalizing rules that would limit the amount of data firms collect on Chinese users and require them to obtain prior consent. Though expansive, the rules won’t apply equally to government data abuse, and could ultimately be used to bring firms more in line with long-term government tech strategies.

We estimate that 1 in 8 digital ad dollars this year will be spent on impressions for ecommerce properties. This week, we discuss our forecast as well as Amazon's rise, which companies are most interesting to watch now, and what we expect as more upper-funnel ads appear in retail media. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer senior forecasting analyst Eric Haggstrom and principal analysts at Insider Intelligence Andrew Lipsman and Nicole Perrin.

Twitter and other tech giants face corporate culture rifts: Reports of employee dissatisfaction at Twitter follow similar news from other major players, all during a tightening market for knowledge workers.

Retail investors and the investing-curious give Reddit a push: Thanks to January's meme-stock craze, the 16-year-old platform's user growth helped fuel increases in ad revenue, which will help the company dive into international expansion and video.

Outspoken employees fear governments could use the company’s CSAM scanning tools for censorship. Apple assures the public it has safeguards in place, but controversy over the features risks tarnishing its reputation as an industry leader on privacy.

Procter & Gamble is the world’s top advertiser: The consumer goods giant is expected to beat Amazon this year after losing its title in 2020’s rankings.

On today's episode, we discuss how travel is changing, how the overall Olympic ratings shook out, why your inbox is now a shopping mall, how brands are already marketing to Generation Alpha, Facebook's Ray-Ban smart glasses, how the office came to be, the limitless power of hugs, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analysts at Insider Intelligence Jillian Ryan, Nicole Perrin, and Paul Verna.

Facebook is rethinking privacy: A recent interview suggests that the company knows it needs to retool how it targets ads to reflect a growing privacy-conscious segment of its users.

Customers still value the ability to visit a physical branch—and banks should accommodate them with a blended approach that incorporates important aspects of both the physical and the digital.