Media Buying

On today's episode, we discuss the main takeaways from Snapchat and Twitter's Q4 performance. Then for "In Other News," we talk about why social platforms are pivoting toward more professionally created content and the significance of Snapchat testing mid-roll ads within Stories. Tune in to the discussion with our analyst Jasmine Enberg.

Apple’s 2021 privacy updates have advertisers approaching iOS with caution and accelerating their investment in Android. Last May, soon after the changes rolled out, US Meta ad spending rose at about the same pace on both types of devices. By the end of December, growth on iOS had slowed to 3% year over year, while Android’s soared to 101%.

Third-party identifiers, upon which programmatic digital display was built, have been under fire for years. Regulatory scrutiny has heightened and consumer sentiment around privacy has grown in favor of increased transparency into, and control over, where and how companies use personal data.

Meta’s lawsuits, settlements, and consumer sentiment are a mounting problem: The company can’t acquire its way out of this one.

Google’s EU antitrust woes multiply: Sweden’s PriceRunner sues Google for skewing search results toward its own shopping service. The move could prompt more legal action from European shopping services.

Meta’s future is muddled by declining Facebook users, slow metaverse adoption and a beleaguered ad model: In response to TikTok's success, Meta will shift focus to video, but will the reactionary move be enough to recover losses?

As retail’s digital dominance grows, Google successfully captures retail ad dollars: Its investments in social commerce on YouTube and improvements to Google Shopping appear to have paid off.

Meta’s earnings miss shows the vulnerability of its ad revenue model: The company could be in for a $10 billion hit from Apple’s privacy changes, and the rise of TikTok isn’t helping.

Long-time Olympics advertisers face controversy, waning viewership: Brands sponsoring the event are staying hushed to avoid upsetting domestic and international consumers.

Spotify confronts brand safety issues amid Joe Rogan dispute controversy: The podcasting giant is adding content warnings as it stands by its popular, controversial host.

Some brands are now dedicating up to 90% of their marketing budget to social advertising. Those who embrace automation and drive cross-platform campaigns are the advertisers that will win in 2022.

TikTok takes up more of its users’ time than any other social media platform in the US. This year, adult TikTok users will spend an average of 38 minutes per day on the short-video app. Twitter ranks second, with a daily average of 35 minutes, while third-place Facebook will see 31 minutes per day from the average adult user.

Winter Olympics provide Beijing the opportunity to scrub China’s internet clean: The door to a free and open Chinese internet is closing fast as regulators aim to reshape the Great Firewall of China.

As video ad spending continues to expand, its share of total programmatic ad dollars will grow.

Instagram introduces subscriptions as it vies for control of the creator economy: As Instagram’s cachet diminishes among younger audiences, it hopes monetization tools will keep creators from turning to other platforms.

Marketers saw the potential of location data early and remain major users of it. But applications are expanding beyond marketing.

Big Tech and government regulators set to clash over new merger guidelines: Industry lobbying and legal delays could outlast current crop of antitrust crusaders.

Mobile app gaming has managed to hold on to its pandemic-driven success and then some, reversing our previous predictions that time spent gaming with mobile apps would decline in the US after 2020.

TikTok aims to generate $12 billion in ad sales this year: Reaching that goal requires the social video platform to lure more large advertisers.