Social Media

On today's episode, we discuss why viral commerce will be the "it" trend this year and why micro- and nano-influencers are making a comeback. We then talk about what to expect from TikTok in 2022 and livestream shopping expectations. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Debra Aho Williamson.

TikTok could be the savior of the box office and travel counter: Pandemic-challenged industries have embraced the social media app in the hopes of fueling their recovery.

Despite relatively low levels of adoption, social commerce features multiply: Meta-owned platforms lead the way when it comes to social commerce features, but TikTok, Pinterest, and others are working hard to catch up.

The metaverse will be put to the test in 2022: Some firms may find their metaverse dreams held back by wearable technology, while others attempt to woo brands to their spaces.

Small influencers poised to gain more brand followers: As social commerce capabilities expand and new tools power the creator economy, the demand for micro-influencers will take off.

Headroom looks to disrupt Zoom fatigue with AI: The new videoconferencing tool integrates productivity and transcription functionality. Can it measure up against leading conference players?

Facebook has a cyber mercenary problem: Meta blocks 1,500 Facebook and Instagram accounts that targeted over 50,000 users—potentially the tip of a wider surveillance iceberg and another smear on Facebook’s reputation.

TikTok's success has renewed social platforms' interest in algorithms: Instagram, Snap, YouTube, and Twitter have all begun implementing algorithmically-recommended content over the past year.

Twitter will count 56.4 million monthly US users in 2021, but fewer and fewer in the coming years, per our projections.

The metaverse is open for business in US, Canada: Meta’s Horizon Worlds, available to users 18+, is likely to attract developers seeking an audience for apps and experiences.

Instagram’s new safety controls for teens could hurt attempts to attract them: The features are intended to halt harmful content, but teens were already losing interest in the platform, and additional limits could be counterproductive.

In an increasingly digital world, we’re now seeing a range of regulatory changes to protect consumers and ensure an optimal digital experience. While data privacy may seem daunting on the surface, marketers can take action to ensure they are aligned with all of these privacy measures.

On today's episode, we discuss the severity of Facebook's young people problem, if we're looking at this issue the wrong way, and whether Instagram can continue to pick up the slack. We then talk about what to make of Twitter's CEO and co-founder Jack Dorsey stepping aside and a reordering of teens' favorite social media platforms. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analyst at Insider Intelligence Debra Aho Williamson.

Digital and alternative advertising lift overall ad spending in 2021: As spending returns to pre-pandemic levels, it’s become clear advertisers find emerging channels more appealing than traditional ones.

UK regulators prune Meta’s walled garden: Meta has been ordered to sell Giphy, and new ownership could bring back the GIF database’s popular ad program, without the antitrust concerns.

As comfort-buying furniture online continues to rise, the direct-to-consumer (D2C) home furnishing sector has exploded with growth and competition. Watch Industry Voices: Spotlight on D2C with Joybird’s vice president, marketing and business development Eric Tsai to hear how the La-Z-Boy-owned brand scales its custom furniture business by staying in sync with consumer expectations.