US Hispanics 2019

US Hispanics 2019

A Big Population Poised for Greater Buying Power

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About This Report
The spending power of the Hispanic market doesn’t yet live up to the size of the Hispanic population. But with education and homeownership on the upswing—and entrepreneurship a continuing strength—this market is poised for greater growth.
Table of Contents

Executive Summary

Yes, the US Hispanic population is big, at some 60 million. But its buying power has not caught up with its size. What matters as much as size is the fact that this population is in flux—with education levels rising, Spanish increasingly superseded by English, and digital usage evolving.

Are Hispanics a lucrative market?

Yes, but with a caveat. Hispanics deploy more than $1.5 trillion in buying power. But their incomes are still below the US average, and median wealth is meager. Hispanics took an especially bad hit from the Great Recession, and many haven’t altogether recovered.

Is there reason to think Hispanics’ financial standing will improve?

There is, including the fact that they’ve already made gains. About one-fifth of Hispanic households have incomes above $100,000. Below-average levels of education have held the Hispanic population back, but a surge in college enrollment promises to change that in years ahead.

Is homeownership the norm among Hispanics?

Not exactly, but it has made some gains after sagging during the recession. Nearly half are homeowners. And Hispanics have accounted for more than 60% of the gains in homeownership during the past decade.

Does digital figure into Hispanics’ shopping?

Of course. Search engines and social media are leading venues for pre-purchase research. Digital is also where Hispanics encounter much of the advertising they see. About two-thirds are digital buyers.

WHAT’S IN THIS REPORT? This report gauges Hispanics’ finances, including the role of entrepreneurship and homeownership. It looks at how much they spend and how they spend it, including the influence of culture and language preference. And it assesses their digital usage.

KEY STAT: Though Hispanics have been making financial gains, a majority still feel on the wrong side of the “haves vs. have-nots” divide. The recession didn’t help, wiping out a disproportionate share of Hispanics’ wealth.

Here’s what’s in the full report

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19charts

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6expert perspectives

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Table of Contents

  1. Executive Summary
  2. Now More Than 10 Years Past the Great Recession, How Do US Hispanics’ Finances Look?
  3. How Do Hispanics Feel About Their Finances?
  4. As Higher Education Is Increasingly Indispensable, Are Hispanics Getting Diplomas?
  1. Do Hispanics Tend to Be Homeowners?
  2. What’s Distinctive About Hispanics as Shoppers?
  3. Hispanics Used to Be on the Wrong Side of a ‘Digital Divide.’ Still True?
  4. Key Takeaways
  1. eMarketer Interviews
  2. Sources
  3. Media Gallery

Charts in This Report

Interviewed for This Report

David Acosta
National Association of Hispanic Real Estate Professionals
2019 President
Interviewed July 23, 2019
Mario X. Carrasco
ThinkNow Research
Co-Founder and Principal
Interviewed July 10, 2019
Marlene Orozco
Stanford Latino Entrepreneurship Initiative
Lead Research Analyst
Interviewed July 11, 2019
Valeria Piaggio
Kantar, Consulting Division
Senior Vice President, Head of Identity and Inclusion Insights
Interviewed July 11, 2019
Roberto Ruiz
Univision
Executive Vice President, Research, Insights and Analytics
Interviewed July 23, 2019
Jose Villa
Sensis
President
Interviewed July 24, 2019

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authors

Mark Dolliver

Contributors

Lucy Koch
Junior Analyst
Oscar Orozco
Senior Forecasting Analyst
Jennifer Pearson
VP, Research
Monica Peart
Senior Director, Forecasting
Shelleen Shum
Director, Forecasting
Yoram Wurmser
Principal Analyst