M&M’s geared up for the Super Bowl with a virtual ad premiere on Zoom

M&M’s geared up for the Super Bowl with a virtual ad premiere on Zoom

Earlier this week, Mars Wrigley’s M&M's brand gave fans a sneak peak of its Super Bowl ad via Zoom, its first-ever "virtual" debut. It’s just one of several efforts the company is working on leading up to Sunday’s big game.

Ahead of the premiere, we spoke with Chris Brody, brand content and communications architect at Mars Wrigley, about the virtual experience and ad creative—which features a gender reveal gone wrong—as well as the company's upcoming social campaigns.

What’s the strategy behind the virtual ad premiere? What are you hoping to get out of it?

Coming off a tumultuous and unprecedented year, we wanted to release our ad in a way that would truly bring people together—even if it’s not in-person. At a time when so many of us are connecting virtually, we thought sharing our spot via Zoom was the perfect way to release it.

How are you getting the word out about this? And what will post-engagement look like?

In addition to a press release and earned media efforts, we’re leveraging social media and tapping some of our M&M’s partners, such as Kyle Busch and coach Joe Gibbs, to spread the word. Beyond the game, we plan to host weekly giveaways on our social channels and will continue to put paid media support behind the ad.

How are you approaching the Super Bowl differently from how you have in the past?

The Super Bowl is one of the year’s biggest platforms and one of our best opportunities to connect with our audience. Our spot premiere on Zoom is focused on how fun and humor (and in some cases, M&M’s) can help bring us together.

We're also utilizing social activations—one of which gives Twitter users the opportunity to receive a free M&M’s delivery via goPuff by using the hashtag #ChocolateTogether on specific teaser posts related to the ad.

Obviously, companies have pivoted a lot amid the pandemic. How have your marketing efforts changed these past few months?

During Halloween, trick-or-treating was limited—and in some cities, even banned. So, we shifted our strategy to reach people at home by launching the Treat Town app, a virtual trick-or-treating experience that allowed families to still partake in the holiday in a safe way.

Mars Wrigley and our brands will remain agile after an unprecedented year. We’ve listened to our associates and customers to ensure that we’re meeting their needs and continuing to deliver some fun to candy lovers everywhere, despite the tough year.