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  • Report
     | 
    SEP 9, 2021

    Gaming. Maturity, Iteration, and Market Sizing. Amazon’s gaming business is a tale of contrasts. On one side, its Twitch subsidiary is a pioneer and category leader in game-oriented streams and is expanding into a broader social video platform.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    TV viewing and video streaming still correlated directly with age. Fully 96.5% of respondents ages 16 to 24 streamed video in H1 2021, compared with 74.4% of those ages 55 to 64. However, the latter’s share rose just over 26 percentage points in a single year.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Between H1 2019 and H1 2020, penetration of paid-for video content rose by more than 12 percentage points. The leap was almost as large this year, with 70.5% of respondents in Q1 having watched SVOD in the month prior. Many correlations noted in 2019 and 2020 between SVOD consumption, age, and income levels persisted in Q1 2021.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    About 9 in 10 internet users watched paid-for video and live TV in Q1 2021. Broadcast TV continued to attract large audiences in Brazil. In Q1 2021, 89.4% of internet users ages 16 to 64 had watched live TV in the preceding month. Moreover, the share of those who recorded TV shows for later viewing recovered from 33.8% in H1 2020 to 36.6% in Q1 2021.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Digital video viewing was almost as widespread in H1 2021, with 94.9% of respondents streaming some type of video content in the prior month. More than two-thirds (68.7%) of internet users had accessed subscription video-on-demand (SVOD) services, like Netflix, as of Q1 2021, including over 91% of 16- to 24-year-olds.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    In total, 98.8% of internet users had streamed video content during the prior month, per H1 2021 data—substantially more than the 90.4% of Q1 respondents who had watched live TV in the same time frame. Yet online TV and video streaming occupied less time each day than broadcast programs, at 1:37 per day. Internet users have also joined paid services like Netflix in ever-larger numbers.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Just 62.7% of internet users polled in H1 2020 had streamed video content in the prior month, for example—though usage was greater in younger cohorts and more affluent homes. But digital video’s reach expanded by almost 25 percentage points in the year to H1 2021, hitting 87.0% as new viewers came on board during the pandemic.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    In H1 2021, 93.2% of survey respondents had streamed video content of some kind in the prior month. On the other hand, digital video accounted for less than half the time spent with live TV, at 1:06 per day. Also, video streaming still correlated roughly with age; penetration was much higher among internet users ages 16 to 34 (over 96%) than among those ages 55 to 64 (82.8%).

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    The share of internet users streaming free or paid-for video content jumped almost 10 percentage points in H1 2021, to 91.2%. (It should be noted that GWI included YouTube in its video category for the first time this year, and at least part of the increase is likely due to that.) Among 16- to 24-year-olds, 97.2% had watched digital video in the prior month.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Video streaming now reaches a larger audience than live broadcast TV. As of Q1 2021, 82.5% of internet users had watched broadcast TV in the prior month. On the other hand, 87.6% had streamed VOD content during H1 2021. Among respondents ages 16 to 44 and those in higher-income households, more than 91% were VOD viewers.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Not surprisingly, SVOD viewing was more widespread in affluent homes; 85.6% of individuals in high-income households watched paid-for video content in Q1, compared with 68.3% of those in low-income households. Age variations were also marked among SVOD viewers—though less so than in H1 2020.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Yet once people are paying for video content, such viewing habits typically persist. General video streaming was even more common, with penetration reaching 94.8% in H1 2021. In fact, 2021 is the first year that at least 90% of all respondents—across all age brackets, income levels, and household locations—said they had streamed video in the prior month.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Other TV and video viewing options were also more widespread than before. In Q1 2021, almost 70% of internet users used broadcasters’ on-demand services in the month prior. And in H1, 84.5% of respondents said they had streamed video content of some kind in the previous month—an increase of 7 percentage points compared with H1 2020. The average time spent each day with online video rose to 1:09.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Notwithstanding these jumps in video viewing, smart TV ownership rose only marginally between H1 2020 and H1 2021, from 37.0% to 39.9%. As in prior years, penetration was greater in middle- and higher-income homes, at more than 43%. Music streaming, gaming, and digital video took up broadly equal amounts of internet users’ time on a typical day in H1 2021, at 1:03, 1:06, and 1:06, respectively.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Nearly 86% of internet users polled in H1 2021—including 99.6% of those ages 16 to 24, and over 90% of those in high-income homes—streamed video content in the previous month. This figure also likely reflects the fact that GWI included YouTube in its digital video category this year for the first time.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Even intensive social networking doesn’t exclude video viewing, though. As of H1 2021, nearly 97% of Indonesia’s internet users had streamed video content of some kind in the prior month, whether via free services like YouTube or paid-for sites. Online TV and video content occupied an average 1:07 per day.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Thanks to the range of digital viewing options, video streaming reached more people than live TV—a shift already noted last year. In H1 2021, 97.4% of internet users in India said they had watched digital video content in the prior month. That activity accounted for 1:49 per day, on average, compared with 1:31 spent with broadcast TV. Digital audio’s reach also surpassed that of broadcast radio.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    But even in the oldest age bracket, over 85% of internet users had recently streamed video. Nonetheless, time spent with broadcast TV in H1 was more than half an hour greater than time spent with online TV and video, at 1 hour, 56 minutes (1:56) per day versus 1:22, respectively. However, broadcast TV no longer claimed more time than social networking, which averaged 1:57 each day.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    Note that GWI included YouTube in its video category for the first time this year, which likely contributed to a higher response rate for this metric. The share of internet users who accessed subscription video-on-demand (SVOD) services, such as Netflix or WeTV, rose by more than 7 percentage points to 64.3% in Q1 2021.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    It’s worth noting that GWI included YouTube in its video category for the first time in 2021, which probably increased the share of respondents who viewed digital video. More residents signed up to paid-for video options, too.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    The sizable increase in SVOD usage helped boost overall penetration of the video services that GWI tracks in Spain, from 65.4% in H1 2020 to 81.8% this year. Another factor may be that GWI added YouTube to its list of services for the first time in 2021. That said, video streaming occupied just 1:14 per day, on average—about an hour less than broadcast TV.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021
  • Report
     | 
    OCT 21, 2021

    It’s worth noting that GWI included the hugely popular YouTube in its video category for the first time this year, and that likely boosted consumption figures. However, that’s probably not the sole reason for the steep increase in video usage. Males, younger adults (ages 16 to 34), and the affluent were the leading consumers of digital video.

  • Article
     | 
    OCT 13, 2021

    Among mobile gamers in the US, more than half said they typically play smartphone games while watching TV.

  • Article
     | 
    OCT 15, 2021

    YouTube videos are the most popular media among US children online, with 85% of those surveyed watching that content recently.

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