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  • Report
     | 
    APR 19, 2022

    ThirdEye’s X2 MR glasses are HIPAA-compliant and enable telehealth for direct communication with the hospital. The glasses can detect the patient’s temperature via thermal sensors and send that data, along with audio and visuals captured by the glasses, to waiting clinicians. Becoming a ‘Digital Patient’. In 2021, “Digital Me” was named one of Gartner’s top emerging technology trends.

  • Audio
     | 
    SEP 17, 2021

    On today's episode, we discuss Facebook's new Ray-Ban smart glasses, whether time spent on TikTok actually surpassed YouTube, what branded gaming on Roblox looks like, how to get noticed as a marketer, whether selling Super Bowl ads early is a good move, how to make friends while working from home, how two people reversed climate change in their hometown, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analyst Suzy Davidkhanian, director of reports editing Rahul Chadha, and analyst at Insider Intelligence Blake Droesch.

  • Article
     | 
    SEP 17, 2021

    Nearly 10 years after the failed Google Glass launch, Facebook and other device makers are trying, once again, to make smart glasses mainstream.

  • Article
     | 
    JAN 13, 2022

    Those included a portable VR headset and VR tracker by HTC; Panasonic’s compact SteamVR headset; new smart glasses from Vuzix and TCL; and smart AR contact lenses from InWith and Mojo Vision. Spanish startup OWO also announced a vest with haptic sensations for virtual games.

  • Report
     | 
    JAN 13, 2022

    Smart glasses as well as VR and AR headsets:. Nearly all Big Tech companies have some form of smart glasses in various stages of development, including Apple, Facebook’s Project Aria, Snap’s Spectacles 3, Amazon’s Echo Frames, and Google, which recently acquired smart glasses maker North and signaled a major push into AR.

  • Report
     | 
    APR 4, 2022

    Apple has moved product categories into the mainstream—will it do the same with smart glasses and AR and VR headsets? Apple’s MR headset is rumored to enter the market in 2023, with smart glasses possibly coming soon thereafter. Could companies like Snapchat or Google launch smart glasses?

  • Chart
     | 
    FEB 1, 2022
  • Audio
     | 
    AUG 13, 2021

    On today's episode, we discuss how travel is changing, how the overall Olympic ratings shook out, why your inbox is now a shopping mall, how brands are already marketing to Generation Alpha, Facebook's Ray-Ban smart glasses, how the office came to be, the limitless power of hugs, and more. Tune in to the discussion with eMarketer principal analysts at Insider Intelligence Jillian Ryan, Nicole Perrin, and Paul Verna.

  • Report
     | 
    DEC 1, 2021

    Counting less-sophisticated smart glasses as AR devices would likely push figures even higher. Metaverse software and development environments will mature. Most of these companies—along with Google—are developing AR or VR software platforms.

  • Article
     | 
    JAN 19, 2022

    IDC estimated that, globally, Apple had a 34.1% share of wearables shipments in 2020, including hearables, smartwatches, wristbands, smart glasses, and clothing—but not augmented or virtual reality (AR/VR) devices. In Q3 2021, that figure dipped to a still strong 28.8%. Apple’s current dominance has led to major investments by other technology companies in smartwatches and hearables:.

  • Article
     | 
    JAN 5, 2022

    Although lightweight and fully functional AR smart glasses are still a few years away, they’re coming as a result of today’s investments by Big Tech. All of today’s investments will also lead to more sophisticated mobile AR. Despite the current visions of a metaverse based on VR, it’s still unclear whether consumers will embrace VR headsets en masse. The bar for smart glasses and mobile AR seems lower.

  • Report
     | 
    AUG 4, 2021

    For instance, a car interface could allow users to order food or parking ahead of time, or people may start to use smart appliances for replenishment orders. Smart glasses and other smart wearables are likely to become more prevalent and replace mobile in some functions in coming years. Practically, however, they will just become another form factor of mobile.

  • Report
     | 
    MAR 18, 2021

    Without the clunky processors in the first generation of smart glasses, such as Google Glass or even Snapchat’s Spectacles, smart glasses may gain more users, and manufacturers are already exploring possibilities. In July 2020, Verizon announced a partnership with smart glasses maker Vuzix to provide 5G smart glasses to first responders.

  • Report
     | 
    MAR 18, 2021

    One issue is that headsets and smart glasses are still fairly expensive and not in the mainstream of the consumer market. Smartphones and tablets are widely adopted and provide a good platform for some types of AR applications. But as with VR headsets and smart glasses, there is a portion of graphical and spatial processing that needs to be done off the device and in the cloud.

  • Report
     | 
    MAR 18, 2021

    Meanwhile, Verizon is investing heavily in 5G and first response, and has even partnered with the wearable and smart glasses supplier Vuzix to co-develop 5G-enabled smart glasses specifically for first responders. How Healthcare Organizations Can Prepare.

  • Report
     | 
    MAY 18, 2021

    Under “Project Aria,” Reality Labs is deploying researchers wearing smart glasses prototypes that collect data about AR interactions in the Bay Area and Seattle.

  • Report
     | 
    APR 15, 2021

    Most AR and MR headsets and smart glasses on the market today—including the Vuzix Blade, ThirdEye’s Gen X2, the Microsoft HoloLens 2, Google Glass Enterprise Edition, and the Magic Leap 1—remain pricey and high-end. AR hardware is primarily used for niche, commercial applications in the military and in the healthcare, education, travel, real estate, and automotive industries.

  • Report
     | 
    MAR 18, 2021

    With low latency, much of the computing for AR can occur in the cloud, allowing for much smaller batteries and computers in devices like smart glasses or VR headsets. With wearables more prevalent, financial services firms can reimagine how to deliver services, such as new ways of biometrically authenticating payments or connecting to customer service via new devices.

  • Report
     | 
    JAN 7, 2021

    Snapchat, an early entrant in the smart glasses space with Spectacles, has a long history of fostering and promoting AR. It was fairly quiet on the wearable side of AR in 2020 (Spectacles do still exist but aren’t heavily marketed), but we think it will make more noise about AR glasses this year.

  • Article
     | 
    APR 1, 2021
  • Article
     | 
    MAR 19, 2021

    Facebook’s hardware ventures—VR headsets, smart glasses, a home smart display, and a planned smartwatch—all exist within the broader context of Facebook’s real revenue source: monetizing user data for advertising. In this regard, Facebook stands to benefit financially from AR hardware that could unlock novel forms of intimate user data.

  • Article
     | 
    JAN 25, 2021

    Boz leads Facebook's Reality Labs, and has plans to roll out smart glasses soon, which will undoubtedly be a privacy minefield. The company has gotten flack—and an antitrust probe—for requiring that users create a Facebook account in order to use its Oculus VR product. But the shift to privacy might stick this time, if only because the legislative writing is on the wall.

  • Report
     | 
    NOV 5, 2020

    It also announced a partnership with wearable tech startup NuEyes to offer assistive smart glasses that use virtual reality (VR) to enhance the vision of people who are legally blind and enable them to watch live TV and on-demand content through the Xfinity Stream app.

  • Report
     | 
    MAR 5, 2020

    Other promising prototypes and products include Abeye’s Lexilens smart glasses that help people with dyslexia stay focused and improve their ability to read and write; Valencell’s blood-pressure-sensing earbuds; and Healium’s VR and AR platform that uses real-time brain wave and heart rate data to detect and slow down users’ feelings of anxiety within a virtual environment.

  • Article
     | 
    DEC 16, 2021

    Snagging Meta’s OS head, as well as integrating existing Google Glass technology with smart glass and gesture tech from North, make for a viable AR strategy.

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