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  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Some 37.0% of respondents owned a tablet—a decrease of nearly 3 percentage points year over year (YoY). Feature phone penetration dropped below 10% for the first time. Confirming the primacy of mobile activity, internet users spent an estimated 4 hours, 16 minutes per day (4:16) on average with mobile devices. Time spent with PCs and tablets was a full hour less at 3:16.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Internet users still spend an hour more each day with PCs and tablets than with mobile phones. More than 77% of internet users in Denmark owned a desktop or laptop in H1 2020, a 2.5 percentage point increase since H1 2019, and that share was close to uniform across demographic groups. Tablet penetration fell slightly to 54.7%, and ownership remained concentrated among older, more affluent respondents.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Tablets also saw a marginal decline from 53.4% to 51.6%. Tablet ownership still correlated with higher income and rising age; however, among PC owners, those connections diminished. In fact, the greatest penetration of PCs this year was among respondents ages 16 to 24, at 85.1%. Predictably, smartphone ownership was almost uniformly high across all demographics.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Tablet penetration declined slightly as well, to 23.4%. However, ownership of both devices remained higher among older and more affluent internet users, and those living in cities—key targets for many advertisers. While PCs and tablets seem to be losing favor, smart TVs too may be nearing their peak. Some 24.7% of respondents owned a smart TV in H1 2020.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    In H1 2020, PC ownership declined among internet users ages 16 to 64 to 82.0%, while tablet ownership increased overall, especially among older and affluent groups. The average time spent daily with tablets and PCs reached 3 hours, 54 minutes (3:54)—while time spent daily with mobile increased to 2:34. The reach of subscription video offerings now rivals that of live TV.

  • Chart
     | 
    MAR 31, 2021
  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Tablets had suffered some attrition, however; 41.1% of internet users owned one in H1 2020, compared with 45.2% in H1 2019. Tablet ownership fell most dramatically among the youngest respondents (ages 16 to 24). PCs and tablets captured the largest single slice of internet users’ media time, at an average 4 hours (4:00) daily in H1 2020, compared with 4:20 in H1 2019.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    In many advanced economies—including Germany, Sweden, Spain, the UK, and the US—time spent with PCs and tablets still exceeds time spent with mobile devices, and by a large margin. By contrast, mobile activity dominates in many Asia-Pacific nations, including China, Malaysia, and Thailand.

  • Article
     | 
    MAR 31, 2021

    An October 2020 survey by market research company The NPD Group and Sensor Tower found that the number of mobile gamers (using either smartphones or tablets) in the US and Canada who were ages 45 and older grew by 17%, while the number of those ages 25 to 44 grew by 13%—the two highest growth rates across all age groups.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Tablet ownership climbed by several percentage points to 37.2%. Internet users in high-income households and those ages 16 to 24 were more likely to own either device. Respondents spent an average 2 hours, 57 minutes (2:57) each day using PCs and tablets and 2:46 on their mobile phones. Subscription video penetration is approaching the halfway mark.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    However, tablet penetration declined almost 6 percentage points to 47.3%. Time spent with mobile devices significantly outstripped time spent with desktops, laptops, and tablets. On average, internet users ages 16 to 64 spent 4 hours, 21 minutes (4:21) per day with mobile phones, compared with 3:35 on larger-screen devices.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    But total time spent with PCs and tablets fell from 2:47 to 2:20 daily. For the majority of web users, digital audio and video coexist happily with traditional broadcast media. Broadcast TV is very much alive and well in China, in conjunction with time-shifted and digital viewing options. Nearly 89% of internet users watched live TV in the month prior to polling.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    As of H1 2020, 75.1% of internet users owned a desktop or laptop, while 36.0% owned a tablet. Ownership of both devices fell more than 3 percentage points from the year prior. Moreover, time spent with PCs and tablets declined marginally to 4:07. Social media usage is a huge contributor to consumers’ total media time, especially on mobile devices.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Smartphones were more widespread in 2020, while the appeal of tablets and PCs may be waning. More than 97.8% of internet users in Spain owned a smartphone in H1 2020, according to GlobalWebIndex. PC ownership had declined by more than 2 percentage points, to 84.6%. Tablet penetration had also fallen slightly, to 58.7%.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    In H1 2020, internet users spent the most time with PCs and tablets, at an average of 2 hours, 38 minutes (2:38) per day. As last year, broadcast TV ranked second overall, claiming an average 2:12 daily. Mobile phones accounted for less time, at 1:38 per day. Most other activities took up less than 30 minutes.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    The share of survey respondents who owned a desktop or laptop slipped from 78.5% to 76.6%, while tablet ownership dropped from 51.1% to 49.4%. This was a pattern repeated in numerous countries surveyed by GlobalWebIndex. Smartwatches did gain fans during the year, lifting penetration to 15.2% of internet users.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Tablets, like PCs, posted a marginal decline in ownership, to 56.9%. Yet penetration of both PCs and tablets remains high compared with most countries surveyed. This is to be expected in a small, highly literate nation where most people enjoy a comfortable standard of living, and where PCs were affordable and well established before smartphones.

  • Article
     | 
    APR 16, 2021

    The number of client-scheduled appointments made via online, smartphone, or tablet jumped 23% from the previous quarter. Last month, Insider Intelligence recommended that financial institutions blend digital tools with physical branches to maximize convenience for customers, and BofA’s increased use of digital for scheduling displays a willingness for such a service.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Additionally, 52.1% of internet users were tablet owners. Internet users spent an average of 3:12 per day with mobile phones in H1 2020, up from 2:54 last year. PCs and tablets accounted for 3:56 per day, almost unchanged YoY. This year’s survey results also point to pent-up demand for some newer digital devices.

  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    As in H1 2019, about one-third of respondents owned a tablet—signaling that penetration of that device may be reaching a plateau, but it was significantly greater among affluent respondents (46.1%).

  • Chart
     | 
    MAR 25, 2021
  • Chart
     | 
    MAR 25, 2021
  • Chart
     | 
    MAR 25, 2021
  • Report
     | 
    OCT 15, 2020

    Tablet ownership posted a greater decline, from 48.6% to 45.4%; just 4.8% of those polled owned a feature phone. Larger-screen devices accounted for substantially more media time, though. Altogether, activities on desktops, laptops, and tablets consumed an average 3 hours, 37 minutes (3:37) per day in H1 2020, compared with 2:38 spent on mobile phones.

  • Article
     | 
    MAY 31, 2021

    People, who were now primarily on their smartphones or tablets, were really looking for bite-size, digestible content. And we adapted everything we did for mobile. That channel became our primary source of outreach not only to our Gen Z consumer but also to all of our demographics because we saw a humongous shift in our demographics searching on or with their phone versus the computer.

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