Retail


Apparel is one of the most popular retail ecommerce product categories, and online sales are growing faster than offline.

How can retailers best connect with shoppers in 2019? RetailMeNot reveals 10 key trends to help marketers shift perspectives, capture audiences and raise the bar on shopping experiences.

Corporate social responsibility appeals to millennials—a generation of researchers who value authenticity, transparency and reliability.

Consumers, especially younger ones, are thinking harder about issues like ecological impact and labor practices when making purchases.

A favorite choice of gift-givers this holiday season? New clothes. The apparel category had its biggest year-over-year performance since 2010.

The numbers aren't in yet, but Walmart might have overtaken Amazon as the largest digital grocery player in the US.

China and India lead the world in the number of proximity mobile payment users, and that's primarily due to an explosion of newly minted middle-class consumers eschewing credit cards in favor of easier to use mobile options.

Efforts to increase supply chain efficiency are nothing new, but as retail ecommerce sales continue to grow, retailers need to be more flexible.

Due to the growing number of channels available and younger consumers reaching adulthood, expectations for customer service have been changing.

Direct-to-consumer brands like Everlane and Bonobos, fast casual grain bowl chain Sweetgreen and beauty salon Drybar are just a few businesses that have adopted a cashless model. But consumers aren't necessarily ready to do away with cash.

Dismayed by a shortage of high-quality bras, and limited store inventory, Heidi Zak co-founded the direct-to-consumer (D2C) startup ThirdLove in 2013. The mission was simple: make shopping for a bra a better experience. With a strong focus on personalization, ThirdLove stocked a wide range of sizes and styles and used customer data to create an innovative buyer journey.

While recent data reveals big differences in attitudes toward a range of shopping-related technologies, there are some noteworthy exceptions.

Retail is in the midst of a radical transformation. In this eMarketer analyst report, we look at what to expect for the US retail and ecommerce markets in 2019, and share key trends that will have an impact on shopper behavior and retailer performance.

Walmart is doubling down on its digital grocery efforts with a splashy new campaign promoting Walmart Grocery Pickup, its click-and-collect service.

Declining mall foot traffic and competition from direct-to-consumer brands and private-label offerings have hurt mid-tier merchants like Toys “R” Us and Sears. But dollar stores are flourishing.

eMarketer's "Do You Have a Second?" is a mini-podcast that offers a quick hit of the latest digital data. Today, we’re talking about online returns for the holiday season, apparel discounting over the Thanksgiving shopping period and consumers' resolutions for the New Year.

Amazon already has a major stake in India's fast-growing ecommerce market. Here's how we know the country is one of its big targets for 2019.

Subscription commerce has captured retailers' attention with its built-in customer base and predictable sales patterns. It may seem like there is a box for everything—think special effects makeup or instant ramen—but not all categories have been embraced equally.

In the latest episode of "Behind the Numbers," eMarketer's Man-Chung Cheung and Monica Peart discuss commerce in China, where technology companies are remaking the brick-and-mortar experience, even as they continue to innovate in ecommerce.

With its increased investment in Instagram Stories, Benefit plans to focus on both organic and paid content in 2019. And rising usage in swipe-up behavior—when a user swipes up on stories content and is taken to a landing page on the brand's website—is opening the door to new opportunities.